A Good Question

What needs to happen, in order to fix a broken system? Your probably wondering what I mean by a broken system. I am talking about the care of women, and especially birthing.

In a nation that has been considered “advanced” we are so far behind the eight-ball that it becomes shameful. Our c-Section rates were seriously through-the-roof, and although some improvement has been made, the United States is still higher than most “civilized” countries! The average being around 31%.

Along  with that outrageous number of c-Sections are the ever-climbing mortality rates of women in birth, predominately women of color. This is shameful in a country that is supposed to be “advanced”!

On top of both high c-Section rates, and high mortality rates for birthing, is the across-the-racial-board birth trauma. It should NEVER happen! But, we have nurses and doctors who force women into procedures, who intimidate and threaten.

The media (film and television) makes it seem that birth is both dangerous and extremely painful. When that consciousness is embedded in the psyche of women, and you have a medical field that relies on mechanical means to monitor births… the stage is set. We have normalized bad birthing practices, and outdated concepts about birth.

That is without discussing the current political scenarios.

The next few blogs will address the history behind, and the current information about birthing in the United States. The outdated concepts surrounding birth practices need debunking. The normalization of bad birthing practices needs to have a light shown upon it, in order to make it STOP.

It is time to become educated,

get angry,

and create a change!

NOTE: I am still doing research, the next two topics are valuable as well, and allows me time to get things done.

Also published at my sister site: Hoksiyuhab Oti

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Symptoms of Marginal Nutrient Deficiencies

 

  • Tiredness or fatigue
  • Stressed
  • Irritability
  • Trouble with concentration or remembering
  • Numbness or tingling of extremities
  • Low immunity or prone to colds or the flu
  • Depression / Anxiety
  • Cravings for sweets
  • Morning Sickness

 

DEPRESSION OR ANXIETY: Deficiencies in vitamin B1.

Whole grains, wheat germ, peanuts, green peas, dark leafy green vegetables, lean pork, cooked dried beans and peas.

CRAVING SWEETS/MORNING SICKNESS: Deficiency in Vitamin B6

VERY PALE SKIN: Deficiency in Folic Acid

FATIGUE:  deficiency in iron

Before becoming fatigued, remember that many foods are packed with iron. So begin eating these foods even before becoming pregnant. These foods are: Black Strap Molasses, Spinach, Kale,

INCREASED COLDS AND SUSCEPTIBILITY TO FLU: Deficiency in copper, iron, selenium, zinc, Vitamin A & Beta Carotine, Vitamin E, Vitamin C, or any of the B vitamins (especially Folic Acid)

DISORIENTATION/NUMBNESS OR TINGLING OF EXTREMITIES/MOODINESS/IRRITABILITY/DIZZYNESS: Vitamin B12 deficiency which causes macrocytic anemia, or if the cause is by a lack of digestive factor, pernicious anemia.  These two are not the same as an iron deficiency.

Found mostly in food of animal origin, i.e. meats, milk and eggs. If found in plant form it usually is due to fermentation such as Miso.

Note: B12 deficiency may put you at risk for a preterm delivery, or a low-birth-rate baby.

 

FOLIC ACID

Folic Acid is one of the B Vitamins.

It is found in:

  • leafy green vegetables
  • wheat germ
  • molasses (especially blackstrap)
  • nutritional yeast
  • whole grains
  • root vegetables
  • beans
  • milk
  • spirulina
  • The liver contains high concentrations of environmental and systemic toxins / not recommended for pregnant women.

For the maximum use of folic acid from foods, eat them: raw or steamed.  You can sautee the vegetables, but remember to do so lightly.  If you boil the vegetables, the vitamin will be leached out of the vegetable into the water.

Eat at least two large portions a day. Also eat the other listed items as well.


SYMPTOMS OF DEFICIENCY

  • The “mask of pregnancy” and other pigment changes
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Persistent vaginal infections
  • Because other B complex vitamins may also be deficient: various nervous system complaints

Babies are more likely to to have neural tube defects (such as Spina Bifida) when mothers are deficient in Folic Acid early in pregnancy. Low day intake of folic acid and /or low blood folic acid levels in the third trimester doubled the chances of preterm delivery and low birth-rate babies.

 

 

 

 

 

Pregnancy Diet For Baby

Plan your meals, AND SNACKS around fresh veggies and fruit, grains and legumes, and ample calcium-rich / protein-rich foods.

Whats-the-Paleo-Diet-3
For those who eat Paleo with Meat

Start your day with a good breakfast:

-Helps energy levels

-maintains optimum weight

-Even just a small meal with some protein and carbs will be beneficial

Eat meals and snacks every 3 to 4 hours

-snacks should include one fruit or vegetables with one serving from another food group.

– Fruit, or vegetable juice (non-sweetened preferably) can substitute for a fruit or vegetable serving.

THE 5-MINUTE MEAL

The trick to preparing a quick, low-calorie meals and snacks are advanced planning, having a basic inventory of ingredients and the right kitchen tools/appliances.

Tools/appliances: microwave oven, slow-cooker, wok or non-stick skillet and a blender

Plan your meals using fresh vegetables and fruit, whole grains and legumes (beans), along with protein rich food.  Try not to have canned fruits packed in syrup, eat oatmeal instead of granola bars, steamed broccoli instead of the packaged broccoli with creamed cheese…

SUPER FOODS
Spinach
kidney beans
Tofu
Wheat germ
Broccoli
Papaya
Salmon
Non-fat Milk 

Eat fresh fruits and vegetables that are in season, when they are not in season chose frozen before canned.
You can add Nuts such as: almonds, cashews, peanuts, pecans, pistachios, walnuts, and peanut butter.

Also add seeds such as:
  pumpkin, sesame, or sunflower seeds. 

PROTEIN RICH FOODS

Proportion size should be three ounces of extra-lean meat, skinless chicken, fish or one cup of cooked dried beans, lentils, split peas or chickpeas.
~Limit eggs to just one per day.

CALCIUM RICH FOODS                                                                                                                  

Cooked black-eyed peas
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Low-Fat Cheese
Collard greens
cottage cheese
Rice Dream
Kale
Yogurt

GREAT GRAINS:

Whole wheat bagel
Whole wheat breads
Sourdough bread
Cornbread
Whole wheat Pita
Rice, preferably brown
white basmati rice
Whole grain Total cereal                                                                                                               Noodles or pasta
Kellog’s, Eggo Homestyle waffles
Cooked cereal: Oatmeal, barley, farina

QUENCHERS:  Sparkling water, apple cider, apple juice, apricot nectar, carrot juice, grapefruit, grape, orange, papaya nectar, passion fruit nectar, peach nectar, pineapple juice, prune, tomato juice, V8 juice.
If you eat well, the occasional treat will not be a problem, so long as it is not a substitute for whole nutritious foods.


Drink at least 32 ounces water (by itself), a day.

Dehydration is one of the main factors of early labor in women.

Drink tea instead of drinking coffee (it dehydrates).

You should try to drink these teas, at least two cups a day:

Red Raspberry Leaf / Nettle tea.

Upcoming Topics

Trust the Process

 

Diet for a Healthy Baby

Vegetarian Diet for Pregnant Women

Symptoms of Marginal Dietary Deficiencies

Folic Acid

Anemia

How to Maintain Your Own gynecological Health

 

You can suggest topics to me, as well:

What is a Doula?

doula at work

What is a Doula?

  • A woman who assists in childbirth
  • A woman who is experienced in childbirth, and provides:
    • Physical, emotional, informational assistance
    • Supports the mother before, during, and immediately after childbirth
  • The word “Doula” is Greek and means “a woman who serves”
    • Today it refers to a trained and experienced professional that provides continuous physical and emotional support during pregnancy, birth, and a short time after the baby is born
  • How they assist
    • With reading materials
    • Make prenatal and post-partum visits
    • Birth plans
    • Self-advocacy tools for pregnant women in a hospital setting
    • Pain management
    • Relaxation techniques
    • Can assure a safe birth/honoring the needs of the mother
    • Validation: birth experiences, and choices made for pregnancy outcomes
    • Support immediately after birth (approximately the first 2 hours after)
  • Research has shown, when a woman is present during labor as a support person that:
    • pain relief is needed less often
    • labor is shorter
    • fewer deliveries with forceps or vacuum extraction
    • C-sections
    • More likely to be still breast-feeding 6 weeks after birth
      • Less likely to have depression during the post-partum period.